Tag Archives: Travel

Need Some Travel Inspiration? Why Not Try One Of These 11 Diverse Festivals From Around The World

Now is the best time to plan your adventures for the rest of the year and travel shows like Destinations (2-5 February 2017) in London are a great way to get a good overview on what’s on offer. At the show you can listen to travel experts, adventurers and journalists, such as John Simpson, Simon Reeve or Phoebe Smith, talk about anything from travel safety to trending travel destinations and get your most burning travel questions answered. Of course, the main question I had for the exhibitors was what fabulous festivals from around the world they loved best and, after doing all the legwork, I put together the below list for you to add to your schedule for the coming year and beyond. Here we go!

travel-panel-destinations-2017

February: Sami National Day Celebrations, Lapland

Sami National Day is on 6 February, it’s celebrated in most of the Nordic countries and is a great way to get acquainted with the age-old traditions of the Sami people. It includes reindeer sprint racing, learning about the Sami language as well as live music. Cities like Tromso, Jokkmukk, Oulu and Murmansk are good places to visit at this time of the year as they have some of the largest celebrations.

May: Fes Festival of World Sacred Music, Morocco

This Moroccan gathering of high-profile musicians from around the world is an event which has long been on my to visit list and looks like a magical experience, even if festivals are normally not your kind of thing. You can stay in a traditional Riad, visit the sights during the day and immerse yourself in the most beautiful music from around the world at night. Unmissable!

May: Teheran Book Fair, Iran

Iran has a rich cultural and historic heritage and the fact that TIBF had around 5 million visitors in 2016 proves its importance for publishing in the Middle East. Of course, you’ll need to look into visas and other formalities in order to be able to visit, but the fair has around 600 foreign exhibitors and offers an enticing roster of cultural activities (author talks, writing workshops) to boot.

June: Transilvania International Film Festival, Cluj-Napoca, Romania

While you might be more familiar with the novel about Count Dracula, TIFF is a popular film festival taking place annually in one of the most beautiful areas of Romania. In addition, Cluj boasts a vibrant cultural scene and no less than nine universities. If you’re visiting a country where English isn’t the main language, international film festivals are a great time to travel there as they are geared towards visitors from abroad and often offer fun side events like director Q&As and parties. Just make sure you book your accommodation ahead of time, as it will be super busy.

July: Tibetan Hemis Festival, Northern India

This recommendation came from my friends at Earthbound Expeditions and looks fantastic. Hemis Gompa, the largest Buddhist monastery in Ladakh, is hosting this annual event, which is also a state holiday, and remembers the birth of Padmasambhava, the founder of Tibetan buddhism. There will be traditional costumes to admire and the sacred masked dances (‘Chaam’) by the Lamas are the highlight of the celebrations.

August: Garlic Festival, Isle of Wight, UK

Interestingly, the soil on the Isle of Wight is apparently so good for growing garlic, the island used to even export it to France. With their motto of ‘In Garlic We Trust’ you get to try unusual delicacies like garlic beer (not so sure about that one) and garlic fudge and an learn cooking with garlic with some experts.

August: Udaya Live Yoga and Music Festival, Bulgaria

Yoga festivals have been taking most of Europe by storm in the past few years and having been to Yoga Connects and Soul Circus in the UK last year, I started noticing lots of other wellness-oriented festivals, including Udaya Live in the Rila mountains of Bulgaria. Imagine spending a few days in stunning natural surroundings letting go of your everyday worries, doing workshops with world-class yoga instructors and learning about anatomy, nutrition and spirituality.

August: Sziget – The Island of Freedom, Budapest, Hungary

Sziget (which means ‘island’ in Hungarian) celebrates its 25th anniversary this year and seems to get ever more popular. Taking place on an island in the Danube, it’s a week-long party of concerts, theatrical acts and other creative fun where you can see well-known headline acts alongside lots of quirky other entertainment. Interestingly, you can bring ‘peaceful pets’, like your dog or even a ferret, along, but not so sure if they’d enjoy the loud music as much as you will.

September: Lake of Stars Festival, Malawi

This was one of the most intriguing recommendations I got, but alas, like quite a few other festivals this year, they are taking a break and will be back in 2018. So plenty of time to plan your visit. The arts festival offers live concerts, children’s activities and other creative events. It has established links with the UK and is also planning some cultural events in Scotland and London for this year, so keep an eye on their website.

November: Kona Coffee Festival, Hawaii

What better combination than sunny beaches and a festival that celebrates the local coffee culture? Welcome to Kona and its coffee culture festival, which is Hawaii’s oldest food festival and revolves around the history of coffee in the coffee-growing Kona region. The yearly harvest is celebrated with tasting events by artisans, farm tours and coffee art exhibitions.

November: Uppsala Light Festival, Sweden

Scandinavia has long been one of my favourite destinations and while there are lots of festivals in Sweden around Midsummer, our Northern neighbours also know how to celebrate the darker time of the year. Head to the fourth-largest city in Sweden for a winter weekend break and experience the magic of ‘Allt Ljus’ – squares and buildings illuminated at night-time. How much more ‘hygge’ can you possibly get?

Disclaimer: Life is a Festival was provided with a press pass for the Destinatons Show 2017. Opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily the same as the official views of the event organisers.

Fly Away With Me: World Travel Market 2016

Living in London has many perks and one of them is that some of the largest events in any industry take place right here. Of course, World Travel Market, which took over the Excel from 7-9 November 2016, is not exactly a festival as such, but it comes pretty close to feeling like one if you’re a travel addict, blogger, or both. It’s a huge event and with nearly 50000 exhibitors and visitors from around the world and a long list of presentations and networking sessions on offer, it’s easy to get overwhelmed. In order to narrow it down a bit, I decided to focus on four areas this year: Travel Blogging, Creative Tourism, Responsible Tourism and Women in Travel and came away with some fascinating insights from all events I attended.

World Travel Market

Travel Blogging has become a huge growth sector in recent years with destination marketers, travel brands and influencers getting a chance to mingle and learn from each other at a lot of events – plus bloggers get access to the press lounge! On Friday, I attended at two events on mobile and live social media and video. We heard from digital communications experts like Flagship Consulting, bloggers, e.g. Niamh Shields of Eat Like A Girl,  and vloggers, such as Evan Edinger and Hannah Witton, who are using video as a blogging tool and I was impressed with their stories of how it is helping them to connect with their audiences, one video at a time. The next day the focus was on personalisation for bloggers and brands and influencer strategy with presentations from travel brands, such as  Cheapflights and Skyscanner, who work with content creators and shared some interesting details on how each of them manage those collaborations. Traverse hosted all of the above events and they are organising a blogger conference in April 2017, see you there!

World Trade Market Press Centre

Another fascinating session and the one closest to my heart was the Creative Tourism presentation on Tuesday. The title ‘Creative Tourism: A Necessary Update’ didn’t sound especially creative or promising, but the session most definitely was! Caroline Couret, the CEO of the Creative Tourism Network, based in Barcelona, presented a number of fascinating case studies on how destinations from different countries, such as Saint Jean Port Joli in Quebec as well as Ibiza Creativa, can attract creative travellers from around the world. Of course, the challenge remains for destinations and brands working in this market to stay commercially viable while providing options for a target group of highly independent and diverse travellers, an issue which I’ve also experienced in my own niche of festival travel. But how encouraging to see that this area has become such a growth market in recent years and is starting to be taken seriously around the world.

The World Responsible Tourism Awards 2016 were also announced during WTM 2016. This was probably the most inspiring event of all I attended, every single nominee sounded like an exciting forward-thinking business and the winners came from all four corners of the world. The overall winners this year were Lemon Tree Hotels in India (socially inclusive work environment and employment for people with disabilities and from disadvantaged backgrounds) and Tren Ecuador (a community-based tourism initiative supporting local people along a train route), both pictures below accepting their awards. I was particularly impressed, for instance, that all Lemon Tree Hotel supervisors are trained in Indian Sign Language and in the case of Tren Ecuador, how lots of smaller projects successfully combine to create a livelihood for many rural families. Further winners included the Sam Veasna Center in Cambodia (wildlife conservation), the Friends International ChildSafe Movement (responsible tourism campaign) and Elevate Destinations (innovation by tour operator). It was also really encouraging to see how many of the organisations and sponsors had female leaders presenting and receiving the awards.

WRTD Awards

Which also makes for a nice segway to my last focus at WTM 2016: Women in Travel. As there were too many events clashing on the Wednesday, I only made it to the last panel session of the day-long Women in Travel Meetup, but was extremely glad I had done so as it was the perfect WTM closing event for me. The discussion organised by Alessandra Alonso of Everyday Mentor focused on female ‘start-up stars’ and we heard from a diverse group of speakers about their individual projects. One of them was Carolyn Pearson, who started Maiden Voyage, a women’s business travel network out of the simple need of wanting to meet other business women travelling alone and Natalia Komis whose start-up I Am Adventures takes artists, entrepreneurs and social innovators on creative adventures around the world. The panel members reminded the attendees to always concentrate on your own business mission and to make sure to join a network. The informal networking session which followed was proof of the friendly and productive atmosphere with interesting connections made with business women from various countries (more on the blog soonish).

So if you’re an established or aspiring travel blogger, destination marketer, translator (I did meet one other linguist specialising in tourism!) or simply passionate about travelling, WTM is the event for you, see you next November!

Disclaimer: This blog claims no credit for any images used in this post. All three images are copyright to its respectful owners, in this case the the official WTM photographers.