Tag Archives: London

Maritime Vibes at Hamburg on Tour Festival 2017 in London

The first thing that greeted me when I arrived for Hamburg on Tour in London last weekend were a couple of smiling, oversized sailor statues outside the Boiler House venue in Shoreditch. Hard to miss! As was this free festival put on by the marketing team of the German port city of Hamburg for the first time in the UK.

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I had been invited to Hamburg in September for a visit during Reeperbahn Festival and thoroughly enjoyed my time exploring the creative, down to earth Northern German city. The London event aimed to present the best of the city’s festivals, sport, film, street art and beer and coffee culture on 20 and 21 October 2017 and by Saturday night, I felt like I was back in Hamburg for the weekend, what a great party!

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But let’s start at the beginning, which, for me, was a speciality coffee cupping session with Speicherstadt Kaffeerösterei in the workshop corner of the Boiler House venue. At that time, there weren’t all that many visitors yet and it felt a bit like your usual travel trade show, with stalls to browse and tourist brochures to pick up.

As soon as the first band, the Nathan Ott jazz trio, got on stage, however, things started picking up and more and people came through the doors to celebrate Hamburg and its many cultural offerings. I had invited a number of friends (from the UK, Germany, USA) along and we had a great time tasting some German craft beer (them) and making my own lemonade from fresh limes (me) at a charity stall.

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One of the highlights of the weekend was Stefanie Hempel’s Beatles Tour, the London version (pic above). Her longer, actual tour takes you through the streets of Hamburg’s red light and music club district where the Beatles had their first break as a band and spent two years in their late teens in the early sixties. Stefanie soon had our group singing along to ‘I Saw Her Standing There’ and other Beatles hits, accompanied by herself on ukulele and we got talking to lots of other Hamburg fans from around the world afterwards.

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Hamburg and its surrounding area are also a great hub for festivals of all kinds: music, film, arts, literature. The London event included sample sets by bands such as Hundreds (see pic above), Odeville and UK-based To Kill a King. In addition, you could watch short films about Hamburg and get up-close to the brand new Elbphilarmonie concert hall by putting on virtual reality glasses for a 360 degree tour, which impressed my friends, who hadn’t been there before. Definitely worth a visit on your next trip to Hamburg!

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Another fun session which was offered at Hamburg on Tour was a street art workshop with award-winning artist and illustrator Macha (pic above), who taught participants to create their own graffiti stencil designs, which were then transferred to a wall near the festival venue to add to a larger work created especially for the event.

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For those not so much into art and culture, football was another topic for the weekend. Hamburg on Tour had invited Ewald Lienen, FC St. Pauli’s technical director, as well as Nick Davidson, who has recently published the first English-speaking book on the famous and quirky Hamburg football club. There is even an FC St. Pauli fan club in London, so you can watch the games with other fans in a local pub.

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All in all a fantastic event, which goes to show that this creative approach to marketing a city to visitors in such a refreshingly different way is definitely a great idea. Don’t forget to check out my Reeperbahn Festival 2017 review and my Solo Travel Guide to Hamburg for more travel and festival tips. I’m already thinking about another visit for some more festival fun.

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Highway to Adventure: The Adventure Travel Film Festival 2017

The Adventure Travel Film Festival, which took place from 11-13 August 2017, had been on my to do list for a few years now and I finally managed to pay it a visit. It is a film festival showing mostly independently produced outdoor, adventure sports and travel documentaries combined with camping just a tube and a bus ride away from Central London at Mill Hill School. The annual event, which also has sister festivals in Scotland  (September) and Australia (February), is run by adventurers and filmmakers Austin Vince and Lois Pryce and apart from the extensive film programme offers talks by well-known explorers, workshops (first aid on the road, medicinal plants, bushcraft, spoon whittling) and even motorbike trial lessons.

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I managed to make it to two of the three festival days, but even though the films were repeated at different times it was really difficult to choose between them as they all sounded really enticing. Some of them also had filmmaker Q&As at the end, like Liemba (a journey on Africa’s oldest steamship), whose director Julie Clavier came over from Paris to present her film. The first film I caught was called Man with a Pram and featured Swedish adventurer and now family man Mikael Strandberg who set out on a two-month walking journey from Manchester to London together with his two-year old daughter Dana and assistant Georgia Villalobos. Alternating between staying with friends and acquaintances and wild camping along the way, the three encounter an intriguing cast of characters, old and young, friendly and odd, on their journey to figuring out what the English are really like as a nation. Definitely one to watch if you think travelling with children is (nearly) impossible, just put them in a pram, pack some nappies and off you go!

This was followed by a triple bill of shorter films: Kapp to Cape, a three-month high-speed cycle journey from Norway to South Africa by British Iranian Reza Pakravan; Two Bedouins, A Camel & An Irishman follows Leon McCarron and his local guide Musallem Faraj into the Sinai desert where they explore the fascinating landscape and learn about the traditional way of life of the nomads; In The Eyes of God Latvian extreme kayaker Tomass Marnics and a handful of his friends tackle the most dangerous rivers in remote Kyrgyzstan.

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Unlike at most other festivals I’ve been to, the venue provided all the food (and I’m assuming they don’t allow outside vendors), so if you’re planning on attending the whole festival, I highly recommend booking your meal plan in advance (this covered cooked breakfasts on Saturday and Sunday as well as dinners on Friday and Saturday night). As I wasn’t staying the whole weekend, I brought my own snacks and supplemented them with coffees and sandwiches from the indoor café (plus there was a BBQ, which included veggie kebabs and veggie sausages, for extra food options). Talking of practical things, there was a shower and toilet block not too far from the camping areas as well as portaloos and indoor toilets in the venues and plenty of drinking water available. I also picked some lovely blackberries right behind my tent, which made for a delicious foraged snack.

After dinner, it was time to attend a talk and the one by native Sri Lankan Dylan Wickrama was very inspiring. He decided to tackle the Pan American Highway on his motorbike and build his own raft to cover the Darién Gap (where no road exists) between Central and South America, resulting in a 30-day solo boat journey (bike on board), which made for a profound experience, including meeting a pod of inquisitive dolphins. It was a beautiful story illustrated by videos and photos from the trip.

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As the weather was quite windy and cloudy on Friday night, the Starlight Screening, which would have normally happened outside, was moved to the sports hall with hundreds of chairs set up for us. The whole festival was efficiently run by the organisers and dozens of friendly volunteers like Kathy and James, who checked me in on Friday afternoon. The feature on Friday night was called DugOut and was a film by and about Ben Sadd and James Trundle, who ventured into the Amazon enlisting a local man to help them fell a tree, turn it into a dugout canoe and then take it downstream for a river adventure. The film is a beautifully made testament to what can be achieved when you have an idea, follow through with it and are open to learning from the locals thereby discovering a whole new world and skills which our Western societies have largely lost.

After a lovely bluegrass live set by The Jolenes (including festival director and ace banjo player Lois Pryce) by the campfire on Friday evening and a peaceful night in the happy tent, the first sessions of the day started at 10am (sadly clashing with the morning yoga class). I picked the How to Make a Film of Your Adventure by festival director Austin Vince talk, who explained in an hour and a half the rules, pitfalls and ideas around making a TV-worthy travel and adventure documentary. So do remember to work with a shot list, vary your sequences (bits of story) and transitions (bits to link the parts of the story, i.e. maps, local flora and fauna, day counters with commentary and/or music), include children, older people and animals and aim to show interesting places, artefacts and experiences plus try and shoot only what you need.

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I also watched Paddle For The North, a Yukon canoeing adventure which, to my delight, included two puppies, Taiga (a golden retriever) and Zephyr (a wire-haired pointer), who made the already intriguing film even more fun to watch. I somehow managed to see a lot of water-based films during the weekend, another one was Rowed Trip describing Canadians Julie and Colin Angus’ seven months rowing and cycling trip from John O’Groats in Scotland all the way to Aleppo in Syria in 2008, particularly poignant to see given the current political situation.

The final event I attended was a talk by explorer Benedict Allen who, together with BBC Security Correspondent Frank Gardener in his wheelchair (he was shot by terrorists), embarked on a quest to see Birds of Paradise in Papua New Guinea. It was another good example of how having a dream and following through with it is what adventure is all about. And this is what this festival is really good at. Inspiring people to turn their dreams into an adventure, learn from the experts and just go for it. But don’t worry, you don’t have to be an adventurous type to enjoy the event. In fact, the festival was definitely on the quieter side and is suitable for families, more laid-back folks (many of them into motorbikes) and anyone with an interest in travelling and filmmaking.

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Disclaimer: Life is a Festival was provided with a weekend pass for the 2017 festival in exchange for a personal review of the event and mentions on social media. Opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily the same as the official views of the event organisers. All photography used in this blog post was taken by Life is a Festival.

Where Tradition Meets Pop Culture: Hyper Japan Festival July 2017

If the aim of Hyper Japan, which took place from 14-16 July 2017 in London, is to get you excited about Japanese culture and about visiting Japan, it definitely did a top job! I’ve been to Japan twice, once as part of a twin town exchange staying with host families and exploring cities like Tokyo, Kyoto and Nara and then nearly a decade later visiting my friends again during a round the world trip. It’s a fascinating country with stunning scenery, super friendly people, lots of cultural events and festivals to explore and the most yummy food you can imagine.

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So I was very intrigued what Hyper Japan would be like. Most of the people I met had been a few times and I could easily see why. There was just so much on offer. They had a large live music stage, Hyper Live, where I saw some Japanese bands like electronic music outfit REOL (really loved their energy and sound, even though I normally never listen to this kind of music) and Fuku Mariwo (see pic above, who plays the traditional nagauta string instrument, but has a modern sound and also had a fantastic dancer with her). After the concerts, you could line up for a ‘meet and greet’ with your favourite artist and get CDs and other merchandise signed.

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There was also another spot where acts performed on the lower ground floor, including Tokyo Rickshaw (see pic below), a J-pop boy band outfit, who had the crowd clapping along in no time. It was really interesting getting an insight into the Japanese popular music scene and the band was a big hit with the mostly younger London festival goers. Lots of them were dressed in elaborate cosplay outfits (see pic above, a world I know nothing about, but which was fantastic to experience) and the atmosphere was generally lively, friendly and fun. I had a quick look around the gaming and anime centre as well, where you could try out lots of new games and consoles with your friends.

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A big part of Hyper Japan are the numerous stalls offering handmade or branded ‘kawaii’ (cute) products, which is a huge thing in Japan. Not having been exposed to so many pastel-coloured fluffy toys, buttons, bags, outfits and accessories of all types since my last trip there, it was great to browse the stalls and speak to some of the vendors, including Hideyuki Izumi (see pic below) who creates elaborate hand-painted resin necklaces and rings. Many of the stall holders are on Etsy and really loved their creativity and enthusiasm. There were also lots of stalls for traditional and pop-culture clothes and a Japanese pottery shop. Although I did quite well not buying a lot early on, resistance was pretty much futile once I saw a ceramic bowl with a rabbit motive and matching chopsticks and also ended up purchasing some unicorn festival earrings (a work-related expense, really!), animal stickers and other kawaii stationery.

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It was definitely time to take a shopping break and I headed to the Hyper Theatre just in time for a fascinating talk with Japanese anime creators. Most of the people in the room knew all about the different series and films and were thrilled to be able to ask Michihiko Suwa (Detective Conan producer) and Atsushi Maekawa (screenwriter of Dragon Ball Z, Fresh Pretty Cure etc.) questions on their career and their latest releases. Afterwards I had a chat with the two interpreters, Chie Kutsuwada and Inko (see pic below), who are actually both manga artists and illustrators themselves, fantastic!

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This session was followed by a talk by travel experts from Tokyo, Wakayama and the islands of Okinawa. While I’ve been to Tokyo during my past trips (but was surprised to learn the mega city also boasts beaches and forest trails), I had not heard much about the beauty of Wakayama prefecture before, which is centrally located near Osaka and Nara and offers lots of outdoor activities, onsen (hot springs) and opportunities to stay overnight at various Buddhist shinto temples. Sadly, it is also where an annual dolphin hunt still takes place in Taiji every September (as highlighted in The Cove documentary), which I’m sure even lots of Japanese people are not aware of, so do check out The Dolphin Project. Okinawa is a group of beautiful islands with lots of historic sights and stunning beaches in the Pacific Ocean which I’d love to explore in future. On the ground floor level were also stalls from different travel providers to help you put together the perfect trip to Japan or plan a language holiday.

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This was followed by a visit to the Sake Experience, which I got to try for free, but would have been well worth the £15 as you get to try 24 (!) sake from different regions of Japan and learn lots about them from the producers. We were moving around the nine stalls in small groups and in mine (see pic below) were a Glaswegian woman, an English guy living in Japan as well as two Nepalese girls. We had so much fun trying the very different flavours and talking with the sake experts. Most of the traditional ones were a bit too strong for me, but I absolutely adored all the sparkling sake (think Prosecco) and there was even a ‘jelly sake’ to try. We got to rate them all afterwards and vote for our favourites at the end of the tour. It was just as well there was so much delicious and authentic Japanese food on offer in the food court to balance out the sake experience, and these included cooked savoury dishes, sushi, desserts and ice cream and veggie options were available, too.

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Somehow the day went by in no time and I could totally see why people would spend the whole weekend here. The 3-day programme is really varied and there were lots of tables and chairs to sit in the courtyards if you needed a break from all the shopping and excitement plus the location (Tobacco Dock, near Shadwell Station in East London) is easily accessible. There were also some great Japanese craft workshops on offer (which could have probably done with a brighter and less tucked away space) and documentary screenings, both of which I would have loved to have done as well, but simply had no time for.

I was very impressed with my first visit to Hyper Japan and am hoping to also make it to the winter edition, which will take place from 24-26 November 2017.

Disclaimer: Life is a Festival was provided with a press pass for the 2017 festival in exchange for a personal review of the event and mentions on social media. Opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily the same as the official views of the event organisers. All photography used in this blog post was taken by Life is a Festival.

River Party, Unplugged: Unamplifire Festival 2017

Imagine a garden party with friends right by the Thames, sipping wine, looking out over the river, a fire going in one corner, fresh food being cooked in another and the sound of beautiful music drifting through the air. Yes, this place exists (even if only for a day) and The Nest Collective somehow made it happen on a day without any rain. Hallelujah!

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I was volunteering with Unamplifire Festival on 27 May and the first part of the adventure was finding the venue in Deptford, which was hidden away a few minutes off the high street, on the banks of the river. Master Shipwright’s Palace (built by master shipwright Joseph Allin in 1708) is a private residence and when I made my way around the building to meet Kelly, the volunteer coordinator, I found myself enviously gazing at the current residents sunbathing in the gorgeous garden dotted with apple trees. What a place to live! We spent the next couple of hours setting up the food stall, the bar and long tables decorated with hurricane lamps and rustic table runners made from burlap and somehow managed to get everything ready before the first musicians were due to be on stage. Phew!

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I was stationed at the entrance giving out wristbands to ticket holders for a couple of hours before I spent the rest of the evening moving between the four venues to enjoy the amazing acoustic music on offer. Hidden away on the first floor of the historic house is the piano room where I took a seat on the floor for the first set of the night by international music collective Kefaya (pic below), who I had already seen and very much liked at Shrewsbury Folk Festival a few years ago. There is such a vibrant, positive energy about the three guys on guitar, bodhran and piano and all of us huddled together on the floor of the sparsely decorated space listened in awe. The band also had a guest singer from Afghanistan, who treated us to a couple of haunting songs from her homeland. Later on, Dizraeli took to the same stage with his fascinating slam poetry and thoughtful songs perfect for such an event.

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As the sun went down over the river I switched between the other room upstairs, the aptly named River Room with a view of the Thames and the large garden, with sets by Nadine Khouri, Nina Harries, Marry Waterson and David A. Jaycock and the outdoor Campfire stage where James Riley, Owl Parliament and Gamelan Lila Cita (pic below) played in the open air. I also had a peek through the large window on the side of the tiny cranehouse, the most exclusive of the four spaces barely holding a handful of people, with lots more revellers gathered just outside, drinks in hand, straining to listen to the unplugged guitar sounds of Piers Faccini and others.

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The Nest Collective ‘warns’ you online that “this is not a wild party, it is a festival of listening and music appreciation. There are no PAs, it is all unplugged, no sound checks, no line checks, just wall to wall music”. And this is exactly what makes this sort of event so special and so precious. It was delightful to see that there is a market for unhurried, pared-down, beautifully simple (in the best sense of the word), real music and it was a pleasure listening to it in the company of others who absolutely ‘get it’. People were free to move between spaces anytime they liked and some had quite young children with them. Nevertheless, it went without saying that everyone quietly found a spot to sit or stand, not disturbing anyone else and fully appreciating the intelligent, creative performances in front of them. I was very impressed.

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If you’re anything like the friendly security guard I had a chat with during my volunteer shift, who admitted he doesn’t really like folk music, maybe it’s time to not judge music and musicians so much by their cover or label. Take some time to give a few not so well-known artists a listen and you might just find the most beautiful music you’ve ever heard.

Ideas of India: The Jaipur Literature Festival at the British Library 2017

When events are successful in one place, it often makes sense to send them travelling so that people in other cities and countries can enjoy them, too. The fourth UK edition of the Jaipur Literature Festival, taking place in the Pink City every January and started by writers Namita Gokhale and William Dalrymple in 2008, was held for the first time at the British Library, from 20-21 May 2017. I was looking forward to exploring a culture and its literature which I knew very little about before the festival, although India has been on my bucket list for quite some time. The diverse two-day programme with authors from across the globe was made up of 30 tempting sessions for literature lovers and also offered some beautiful Indian live music, including a lively set by amazing Mumbai-based band Kabir Café on Saturday night. I did my very best to attend as many of the events as possible and came home with some great stories and lots of fascinating reading material in my very beautifully designed festival bag.

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The very first event on Saturday morning was a live music session with singer Vidya Shah and poet Arundhati Subramaniam introducing us to some mystical devotional Bhakti poetry in the Piazza tent set up for the festival in the courtyard of the British Library. I stayed on for ‘The Beatles in India’ with Beatles biographer Philip Norman, who had some very entertaining and surprising stories on the band’s time at the ashram of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in Rishikesh.

Academic Rachel Dwyer’s interview of Bollywood director Karan Johar was predictably popular. Having not been much of a fan of this genre of film before, it definitely made me curious to find out more about its history and place in Indian culture in future. One of my favourite panel discussions on Saturday was ‘Migrant Words’ with writers Amit Chaudhuri, Lila Azaam Zanganeh, Meera Syal and Prajwal Parajuly very ably and humorously chaired by Anita Anand. The panellists shared their thoughts on and issues with identity and home, which all of us not living in the countries we were born in can certainly identify with. One of the most surprising and enlightening events for me was ‘The Genetics of Skin’, which I hadn’t originally had on my to-attend-list. Dr. Sharad Paul talked eloquently about the history of the human skin and skin colour and how it affects our health in a myriad of ways.

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The ‘India Votes’ as well as ‘The Rise and Fall of Mughal Art’ sessions were a great reminder why I love festivals so much as places of informal learning, as I picked up a lot of information about Indian politics and art. While most of the other attendees I spoke to had a connection with India and therefore an obvious reason for being there, there were also other members of the audience who had been brought along by friends or were planning a trip to India in the near future. As far as I’m concerned, festivals which promote a particular culture or country are a great place to do research for your travels as – unlike in most regular guide books – they provide you with up to date information on current events (e.g. recommendations for The Sacred Pushkar Festival and The Ragasthan Festival) and access to lots of knowledgeable people to quiz about your chosen destination.

The second and last festival day was equally busy. The ‘Footloose’ travel session, which was one of my favourites purely because it was such a pleasure to hear some of the top travel writers read from their own work, in this case William Dalrymple, Anthony Sattin, Hugh Thomson, Samanth Subramanian and Monisha Rajesh. A little later, British writer Giles Milton told us the fascinating story of ‘Nathaniel’s Nutmeg’, which highlighted the many issues and quite gruesome conduct during colonial times. Food for thought indeed.

‘Shaping the Novel’ with writers Kunal Basu, Sarvat Hasin, Amit Chaudhuri and Tahmima Anam discussing the art of novel writing with festival director Namita Gokhale and ‘Ideas of India’, a panel discussion with some of the festival authors, were a real treat at the end of this wonderful festival, which was illuminating in so many ways. Most importantly, it has put India on the map for me and I’m not just talking about its vibrant, diverse culture, but the many individual voices I listened to over the weekend, the identities this vast country is shaped by and their hopes for a common humanity, which we can all learn from.

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On a more practical note, all weekend the three festival venues inside the British Library, the large knowledge centre theatre, the Piazza tent and the BL foyer (these events were free to attend, which was good to see given that all events at the original festival are free, too) were brimming with lively energy. I have rarely seen such a smiley – even if naturally extremely busy – festival team. Every single event I’ve been to was very well attended, which suggests that the organisers might look into expanding the venues in the years to come. It would also be lovely to see additional, possibly more interactive events, in order to draw in a younger crowd, too, as well as some Indian food and drink to also get to know the various flavours of Indian cooking.

Quite exhausted from the two-day literature marathon, but very happy to have learned so much about the many different Indias, I am now even more keen to make it to Rajasthan for the original Jaipur Literature Festival, which is the largest free festival of its kind. Those of you based in the USA or heading there later in the year might like to know that the festival will also be travelling to Boulder, Colorado (another place on my ever-growing bucket list) in September 2017. You just can’t escape extraordinary literature!

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Disclaimer: Life is a Festival was provided with a press pass for the festival.

The Future of Wellness: A visit to Balance Festival 2017

With wellness having been such a trend for big city dwellers in recent years, London is the perfect place to put on an event like Balance Festival, which was held for the first time from 12-14 May 2017 in East London’s Truman Brewery. It is aimed at ‘Londoners embracing a healthy lifestyle’ with a big focus on fitness and healthy nutrition. Organised by Allegra Strategies, who also run the London Coffee Festival, the event included a health summit with a series of cutting-edge talks by speakers from the world of health and fitness, which I attended on the industry day on Friday.

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Fortified by a super yummy breakfast, which consisted of fresh berries and Pip & Nut butter on crispy bread from Flour Power and almond latte from Ozone coffee roasters, I was ready for the morning of inspiring talks. The programme sounded fairly businessy, i.e. dry, at first, but turned out to be really interesting! Oren Peleg, CEO of Fitness First, explained how he guided a failing global business back on track by concentrating on different priorities for different markets, e.g. dance and fight classes in Asian gyms, as well as making the gyms a community focus with feedback from local managers. The rise of ‘Veggie Pret’ (from doing a poll to running a pop-up to a permanent shop) was charted by their brand director Caroline Cromar and it was exciting to hear how well specifically their vegan range is doing – vegan brownies I’m coming for you!

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We also heard about the latest industry trends from Daniela Walker and Jessica Smith of The Future Laboratory, including sleep retreats, recovery sleepwear, chroma yoga and wearable technology. Cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra and nutritionist and chef Dale Pinnock explained that health and weight management needs to become much more individualised, focusing on preventive metabolic and nutritional health rather than fixing things with pills. The final talk of the summit was an interview with Ella Mills, founder of Deliciously Ella, who spoke about the challenges of being in the spotlight, sticking to a healthy lifestyle and her latest foodie creations.

In the afternoon, I had a look around the exhibitors’ stalls and came across some very inspiring ventures. The first one was ChicP, founded by Hannah McCollum, who turns surplus vegetables into sweet and savoury hummus and is also going to be at a few UK festivals this summer. Another idea I really liked was Balanced Tourist, who provides a service sending you a curated box full of travel-sized plant-based whole-food snacks which comes in handy to all of us travel lovers as they are cabin-size-friendly. I also had an espresso from Volcano Coffee Works whose roastery is based in Brixton. While customer manager Sarah popped the plasticy looking pod in the machine, I was thinking, oh no, here we go, it’s not environmentally-friendly, until she told me, it is actually 100% compostable. Cool!

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So, should you make space in your calendar for this 3-day celebration of food, fitness and wellness? Absolutely. If fitness and healthy eating is your priority, you can learn a lot about the latest industry trends and sample classes from some of the most innovative fitness and yoga companies in London. If you’re mainly into yoga or are a more introverted type, some of the summer yoga festivals (more reviews coming up in June and July) might be a better choice for you, unless the talks and quieter sessions could be moved away from the live-DJing areas and busy food court to a separate space, e.g. upstairs in the future. All in all, I had an interesting day networking with lots of friendly fitness enthusiasts and start-ups and picked up a lot of beneficial health and nutrition tips.

Disclaimer: Life is a Festival was provided with a VIP pass for the festival’s industry day.

Where Travel Blogging Conference meets Festival: Highlights from Traverse 17

I found out about Traverse 17 at World Travel Market last November and immediately thought that their programme sounded a lot like a really tempting festival schedule: crazy golf, parties, workshops and walking tours all in the company of around 500 travel bloggers from around the world. Who wouldn’t want to sign up for that?

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Cultural Events, Fun Experiences & Networking with Travel and Lifestyle Brands

Being based in London proved a big plus for this year’s conference as I managed to attend a good few of the 40 or so events the Traverse team put on during the week. Our first meet & greet with fellow bloggers took place at Kouzu Restaurant near Victoria Station whose prosecco and delicious Japanese food was incredibly moreish. On Tuesday I gave Junkyard Golf at the Truman Brewery in East London a try and we learned all about Gran Canaria as a travel destination. My God, it was like escaping into a parallel world where dinosaurs devour pigs (eek!) and in teams of 4 or 5, colourful cocktails in hand, we fought our way through a maze of neon-lit rooms, fun slides and derelict car parts. We also got to toast our excellent choice of attending this conference on the rooftop terrace of the Expedia office near Angel station one night and at the digs of the Lonely Planet publishing team south of the River on another night where we learned about their Pathfinders programme.

team pic at Junkyard Golf

Whyte & Brown café just off Carnaby Stret welcomed us for an influencer breakfast courtesy of Carnaby followed by one of my favourite events of the week, a practical youtube skills walking tour led by Tom Hooker of Out The Box. He was so great at giving tips and sharing advice and it was super inspiring. So were a lot of the bloggers I met that day and during the whole week. I also headed to the Olympic Park for a Tea, Tour & Tech tour run by London City Steps, which included a visit to the Orbital (sadly we were too late to give the longest, highest slide in the world a go…) and the Olympics 2012 Aquatics Centre (now a really stunning looking community swimming pool) plus learning about the local history.

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The Friday night welcome party thanks to Jet2Holidays took us to Skyloft on the 28th floor of the Milbank tower with the most amazing views over night-time London. Just wow! On Saturday night we boarded a Citycruises boat for a sunset cruise on the Thames sponsored by Cheapflights and, naturally, we made the best of it with lots of social media posts, good conversations and selfie-opportunities galore. The closing party on Sunday night was held at Iberica Restaurant in Canary Wharf courtesy of the Spanish Tourist Board and their truly lovely UK team. The food, authentic tapas with some good veggie options, was absolutely gorgeous, the venue looks fantastic and is well worth a trip across town.

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Life and Career Advice

With all the fun events happening I tried to also make it to a few more serious workshops, both held at WeWork coworking spaces around London. At WeWork Paddington a smaller group of us worked on developing a new business concept in the ‘Half-Day Company’ session and at WeWork Moorgate we picked up time-management tips from Alice of Teacaketravels and learned about positive thinking and NLP from cognitive hypnotherapist Gemma Holmes. Of course, the real work is finding a system that works for each of us personally, but learning from the experience of others and sharing thoughts and ideas in a supportive environment was very motivating.

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Learning from the experts during the conference weekend

I’m going to talk about the excellent sessions I attended during the conference weekend in a separate blog post sometime soon, as there is just not enough space to go into detail about them all here. One thing which quickly became obvious to most of us during the conference weekend, however, was that you had to pick wisely from the 50 classes and sessions on offer. I tried to attend a mix of more business-related classes as well as generally inspiring ones, all of which tended to revolve around relationship building with brands, followers, fellow bloggers, SEO, professional branding, marketing, PR, book publishing and contracts. There was also an opportunity to arrange a one-to-one pro-bar chat with conference speakers and a chance to meet the representatives from various destinations and brands, such as Spain, Ireland, Hamburg (London mini festival coming up in October 2017!), Cathay Pacific, Agoda, affilinet, Donkey Republic, Topdeck and Trip.com in the lobby area of the Ravensbourne where the conference was held.

Traverse 17 programme

Making new travel blogger friends from around the world

From the very first event on Monday night until the closing party on Sunday there were plenty of opportunities to get to know other travel bloggers (and in fact some food, fashion and lifestyle bloggers too), be it at the larger events with a couple of hundred attendees or at the smaller workshops and tours for a dozen or so people. I was amazed at the fascinating stories I heard and the things I learned just by talking to a couple of new people every day who included Anna of Would Be Traveller, Nicole of Lost in This Whole World, Tom of Spaghetti Traveller, Charlotte of A Much Prettier PuzzleIk Aldama, Gemma of Little Miss Gem Travels, Teresa of Brogan Abroad, Liza & Pepe of TripsGet, Heidi of Take Me To Sweden, Eulanda & Omo of Hey Dip Your Toes In, Alison of Up & At Em, Juuli Aschan, Corinna of Aussteigen Bitte!, Lexx of Travel Lexx, Annemarie of Travel on the Brain, Katy of Untold Morsels, Inka of Inka’s Tour, Lauren of Bon Voyage Lauren, Asma of Jet Set Chick, Sara of Speaking of Sara, Janos of Solaris Traveller, Jess of Jess In Your Ear, Becky of Munchies & Munchkins, Ant & Lou of Vanutopia, Anne-Sophie of City Cookie, Emily of London City Calling and lots of other friendly travel-crazy content creators. When I was on my way home after the closing party, a bit sad that it had all ended after such a fun week of events and meeting like-minded people, I heard a guy in one of the tube stations playing ‘What a Wonderful World’ and I thought, absolutely, thanks for summing it all up for me!

Travel bloggers Canary Wharf.jpg

A big thank you to the organisers Michael Ball, Paul Dow and their team for making this ‘conference’ so incredibly festival-like, to the speakers for their awesome advice and to all the brands and sponsors for treating us like royalty with various goody bags and competitions, but most importantly their enthusiasm for their destinations and brands, which was truly refreshing to see. More blog posts in the pipeline, watch this space.

Next year’s Traverse 18 will be held in Rotterdam where I’ve never been, so now I have the perfect excuse for a trip and I suggest you come along for the ride. I also cannot wait to find the city’s best cultural spots, veggie cafes and cuddle and snap some handsome dogs for my new Instagram project @cuddleadogaday (thanks to Heidi for the suggestion!).