Tag Archives: dogfest

Dog Days of Summer: Dogfest Bristol 2018

After having had such a great time at Dogfest South last year (see review) and being a huge dog lover, I gave the latest addition, Dogfest West (23-24 June 2018) in Bristol, a try this time around. The location for the festival was Ashton Court Estate, a huge park area just outside Bristol and, like last year, the weather was fantastic.

Dogfest Dog Walk.jpg

After grabbing some fresh drinking water from the Bristol Water fountain, with volunteers counting how many plastic bottles were saved by providing free filtered water, I did a quick round of the stalls before getting ready for The Great Dog Walk (see pic above). Sunday’s walk was introduced by TV presenter and dog lover Chris Packham and it took place twice a day with two route choices, 2km and 4km. Everyone can take part and the path luckily led into a foresty area with lots of shade, which I and the participating dogs were very grateful about. Unlike the one at Knebworth (Dogfest South), it is partly a little steep, so definitely wear trainers and bring a bottle of water to keep hydrated. We were back at the festival grounds after about 45 minutes (2km) and all the dogs taking part looked pleasantly tired. Right by the back entrance there were a couple of bone-shaped paddle pools for the pooches to cool off in, with some of them completely sprawled out in the water to make the best of the welcome refreshment.

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There was also a diving pool again (see pic above), where dogs who love water could take a leap from a ramp or walk into the water to retrieve a tennis ball. Some had clearly got experience and loved being in the pool, while others were hesitating at the edge of it, longingly staring at the yellow ball bobbing in the waves, but unable to decide whether it was worth getting wet in order to get their prize. It was fun to observe, just make sure you queue early as it was busy pretty much all day.

Dogfest making furiends.jpg

Like at Dogfest South, all the stalls selling dog-related items, such as dog treats, harnesses, cooling blankets, dog shampoo and accessories or promoting animal charities plus all the food stalls were arranged in a large circle. The Live Stage was in the middle section of the large open field with bands entertaining dog parents and a very nice bar with deck chairs under a sprawling white canvas. This stage was also where festival founder and Channel 4 ‘Supervet’ Noel Fitzpatrick and his colleagues gave talks and advice on pet ownership and pet health (see pic below).

Dogfest live stage.jpg

The Dogfest organisers had again provided lots of fun activities for dogs to try. Fourlegged festival goers could test various fun sports, such as flyball and agility, as well as hay bale racing and resist treats in the temptation alley plus there was a school for dogs, a dog activity ring and a dog show. Of course, I was busy petting lots of friendly dogs and puppies (!) all day and also got to speak to their owners. Some pooches were rescued from as far as Serbia, elderly Reg, the sheep dog had his own ‘regmobile’ built by his dad to take him around in and one girl had borrowed her friend’s dog so it could enjoy the event.

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The food and drink village inlcuded plenty of different delicious options with pretty reasonable prices and enough veggie choices. I had a nice, large plate of Mexican food for about £7, my iced latte was £3.50. Other stalls sold wood oven pizza, fish & chips, Asian noodles, burgers, cakes and ice cream.

Dogfest tent

Of course, there weren’t just treats for the humans attending Dogfest. The fourlegged visitors were spoiled for choice with dog ice cream, healthy looking baked treats and evend drinks for dogs. I’m not so sure about the last one, but I observed several pooches licking their bowls of dog ice cream clean with a very contented expression on their fluffy faces. As one of the England Worldcup matches was on on Sunday afternoon, there was a TV screeen conveniently installed for the football fans taking a break from all the doggy activities with a cool pint or prosecco.

Dogfest Bristol Water.jpg

Dog welfare was a big priority at the event, with bowls filled with water available everywhere and stalls offering health checks throughout the day. If there was one thing I would suggest for future events, it would be to have more areas that provide shade, especially in these hot temperatures or also in case of more rainy weather. Make sure you bring enough sun protection, a cooling blanket or coat (see pic below) for your fluffy friend, a refillable water bottle and maybe an umbrella for some extra shade.

Dogfest watching football.jpg

If your dog gets on well with other dogs, it’s definitely a fun day out and you could even make a holiday out of it by visiting nearby Somerset attractions, such as the Glastonbury Tor (dogs allowed but mind the sheep) plus White Spring Well and Temple, the historic town of Wells with its impressive Cathredral and Vicar’s Close, claimed to be the oldest pureley residential street in Europe, or visit the beautiful Roman City of Bath and Bristol with its Clifton Suspension bridge and its lovely pubs and cafes by the harbour.

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Glastonbury for Dogs: Dogfest 2017

While a certain huge live music event was taking place elsewhere in the UK, I headed to Dogfest for a day, which was promoted as ‘the ultimate summer festival for dogs’ and that’s exactly what it felt like! I’m not sure if I could have enjoyed myself even more if I had been a pooch, but I certainly had an amazing day. What started out in a field behind Channel 4’s Supervet Prof. Noel Fitzpatrick’s Surrey practice (pictured below with his border terrier Keira) is now a huge event happening on two consecutive weekends, Dogfest North in Cheshire on 17 and 18 June and Dogfest South on 24 and 25 June 2017, which I attended, at Knebworth House near Stevenage, about half an hour north of London.

Dogfest Noel and Keira.jpg

Getting to the Festival (hitchhiking with dog lovers included!)

As the directions to get to the festival site looked pretty straightforward online, I hopped on a train and then the 44 bus from Stevenage bus station, asking the driver to drop me off at Manor Farm, the nearest stop along a country road. So far so good. It looked like a 10-15 minute walk, at most, and I quite enjoyed the idea of it, yet alas, despite GPS on the phone, I ended up following a road that took me further and further away from the venue, so confusing. I ended up trying to wave down other festival goers from the side of the road and was super lucky lovely dog owners John and Katherine let me hitch a ride with them and Jack Russell Dodger (see pic below) in the backseat. It still took us and seemingly quite a few of the other dog enthusiasts a number of wrong turns until we were finally on the right track, but when we eventually arrived, it was like getting off at the kind of playground any dog-loving adult would enjoy: dozens and dozens of dogs of all shapes and sizes with their owners in tow were making their way to the main entrance. I could barely contain myself, it made me so happy to see all the wagging tails and excited pooches pulling at their leads.

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Venue

The festival was spread out on a field behind Knebworth House, which was much larger than I expected, with many interesting stalls lined up around the edges of it. There were all sorts of accessories and nutrition for dogs on offer (including some useful looking dog cooling coats for hot weather), as well as holidays with dogs and health checks and grooming (weight management, ticks, canine massage etc.) and various stalls by dog and wildlife charities (even one for cats). I also spoke to Pete of Cold Feet Huskies, who had brought some of his dogs along and races them around the UK and further afield. I could have easily spent a couple more hours just taking a look at all of these. The food options were also quite varied (burgers, burritos, English fare, falafels, ice cream, proper coffee) including some good veggie choices.

Dog Activities

There were lots of great activities for the dogs to try including my favourite, the diving pool! There was a long queue all day for pooches to go for a swim in the tempting looking clean water as it was a pretty hot day. Some of the dogs were not quite sure if they really felt like giving it a go, but others couldn’t wait to jump into the waves, splashing the assembled audience with water left, right and centre. It was so much fun to watch and no doubt even more fun for the dogs who took apart. Other activities included learning to do agility with your dog, dog competitions, a ‘school for dogs’, hay races and a ‘temptation alley’.

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Dog Welfare

I was a little bit concerned about this before attending the event, but as far as I could see anything humanly possible had been done to make sure the dogs were all right. There was a first aid and show vet on site plus containers with fresh water spread around the field (which some of the smaller breeds quickly identified as ideal paddling pools), some tented areas with hay bales for owners to sit on and one particularly nice tent with tables, chairs and a bar at one end, so you could enjoy a nice glass of cool wine and your dog could rest in the shade right opposite the ‘super stage’ where Noel Fitzpatrick did his talks and live music performances were on all day. I was generally very impressed with how well the hundreds of dogs got on with each other. Hardly any barking (apart from excited yaps!) could be heard all day and the event clearly attracted responsible dog owners and well-adjusted pooches. If you have a puppy, attending Dogfest could be a good opportunity to socialise it in a friendly environment, all the puppies I met and petted looked very happy indeed, including little Anakin, the Chihuahua (pictured below).

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The Great Dog Walk

At 3pm hundreds of dog owners and their pooches gathered for the great dog walk in aid of The Humanimal Trust across the grounds of Knebworth House, either for a 2km or 4km stroll, and Noel Fitzpatrick brought his little border terrier Keira along for a short talk before it started. Once it was all go, the many happy smiley dogs dragging their owners across the field were a real sight to behold. Walkies on a giant scale!

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Unconditional Love

Having seen ‘The Supervet’ Prof. Noel Fitzpatrick only on TV before, it was great to hear him speak live about his own career and the lives of animals and people him and his team were able to make a difference to. Some of the dogs from the TV programme, who had meanwhile fully recovered, were also present, which was lovely to see. He also talked enthusiastically about his charity, the above mentioned The Humanimal Trust, which aims to “reduce, refine and replace animal experiments with reciprocity – which means that we only sponsor research that helps animals with naturally occurring disease, not through the use of experimental models.” It’s a ground-breaking idea to help humans AND animals, so both species win, not one at the expense of the other. Noel spoke about the huge amount of unconditional love being present in this field on this day and how our love for our pets can really make a difference to our own and other people’s lives.

Dogfest Superstage.jpg

Pawmazing Day

All in all, it was a great day out for dogs and humans alike. My advice if you’re coming by car and are bringing your dog would be to either get there very early or in the afternoon in order to avoid the at times longish queues to get into the car park right beside the main entrance. If the weather is very hot, it might even be better to take a train and a cab (it cost only £6 for a single taxi trip from Stevenage rail station, which I should have opted for on the way there, too). And don’t worry if you haven’t got a dog, I don’t either as I travel too much and I still had an absolutely fabulous time. In fact, everyone was so friendly, I got chatting with quite a few dog owners and heard so many inspiring stories of rescues finding a forever home and friendships between dogs and humans, it was actually quite emotional. One of them was Blarney (see pic below) who was adopted from Ireland. It’s also a great opportunity for those looking at getting a dog to find out which breed or type of dog would be suitable for them, ideally of course a rescue dog, as there are so many of them waiting to be adopted in shelters around the country.

Dogfest Blarney.jpg

Cuddle a Dog a Day

If you’d like to see a few more pictures and some videos of chocolate lab Dizzy diving into the pool, the dog and duck (herding) show as well as footage of the Great Dog Walk, do check out my Cuddle a Dog a Day Instagram account. I started it in April this year as my daily goal is to pet at least one dog a day (or any fluffy animal really) and it’s been a great way of documenting the cute dogs I meet (pictured below are Spanish rescue Killick and Pomerian Lola) and of connecting with other dog lovers from around the world. I follow back genuine dog/dog parent or other animal lovers’ accounts.

Dogfest Killick and Lola.jpg

Not all Dogs are so Lucky

Lastly, spare a thought and maybe a few pounds to abolish an altogether different event, the horrifying Yulin ‘festival’ in China, which is sadly happening again right now (despite millions of people signing petitions and protesting around the world) and involves the torture and slaughter of thousands of dogs and cats. No animal should ever have to suffer like this. Find out how you can help and maybe consider minimalising animal suffering in your own community by reducing or cutting out meat from your diet and learning about vegetarianism or veganism.

Disclaimer: Life is a Festival was provided with a complimentary ticket for the festival.