Tag Archives: celtic connections festival

Discover Glasgow During Celtic Connections Festival

I first visited Glasgow in 2016 as I had heard so many good things about Celtic Connections, a huge nearly three-week long midwinter multi-genre music festival, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. Despite the admittedly terrible January weather, I fell in love with both the city and its people (their slogan ‘People Make Glasgow’ couldn’t be any more accurate) and have been excited about returning there ever since. This year it runs from 18 January until 4 February 2018.

Here is a wee guide for those of you who haven’t been to Glasgow or the festival before in order for you get the best out of this fabulous event and discover one of my favourite cities in the UK.logo 25th anniversary.jpgWhy visit during Celtic Connections?

Having travelled to festivals on various continents before, one thing a lot of cities have in common is that during festival time they are at their absolute best. There is usually a lively, buzzing atmosphere, lots of side events (sometimes even free of charge) and while heading out to see your favourite artists, you also get a great overview of all the best venues in the place you’re visiting. Don’t forget to get talking to other visitors and local festival goers and exchange recommendations, it’s a friendly city with many helpful locals.

What kind of music can I expect?

Celtic Connections is a fairly eclectic festival and has always been open to showcasing not just Folk and Americana (including some very big names on the scene as well as the most talented newcomers from the British Isles and overseas), but also world music, some jazz and quite a few indie bands. The 2018 artists include Frank Turner, Cara Dillon (pic below), The Lone BellowDougie Maclean, Oumou Sangare and some very exciting special collaborations, for instance a tribute concert to Tom Petty. You can take your pick from major historic and modern venues, such as the Royal Concert Hall, the Old Fruitmarket (see last picture) or the O2 ABC or attend a concert at a medium-sized or smaller venue, such as Oran Mor in the West End, the Tron Theatre, St. Andrews or Saint Luke’s a bit further east or The Glad Cafe on the Southside. They each have a unique atmosphere and some are seated, standing or both.

CaraDillon.jpg

Where should I stay and for how long?

I stayed in different places every year so far, hotels as well as B&Bs, and there are many budget-friendly options. The West End is a lovely area for eating out or staying in, just west of the city centre, but most gigs are taking place in more central venues. You can easily discover the best of Glasgow in a long weekend, but if you can manage to add a day or two, it will be even more relaxing and you can spend your days sightseeing, taking walks around different neighbourhoods, exploring the many excellent museums or whiling away a few hours in a cosy café (see the bottom of the post for foodie tips) until it’s time for the evening concerts.

Are there any additional events apart from the main concerts?

There are a number of lively evening ceilidhs and some family-friendly daytime ones, too. Plus, the very popular festival club nights at the Art School (right in city centre near the CCA) will again be taking place Thursdays through Sundays from 10.30pm til late and the secret line up of festival artists is always worth checking out. If you prefer a seated venue for your after-hour celebrations with old and new festival pals, then the late night sessions at the Drygate Brewery (east of the city centre near Glasgow Cathedral, from 11pm on the same nights) are ideal for you. You can also try your hand at playing music yourself at the many workshops for kids and adults throughout the festival.

Old Fruitmarket_credit Louis DeCarlo.jpg

What kind of ticket options do I have?

Celtic Connections does not offer festival passes, so you do need to book each gig individually through their official website or hope for last minute tickets at the door (would not recommend this unless you’re fairly flexible). If you’re planning on attending quite a few concerts, you can join the Celtic Rover Scheme (currently from £20), which gives you a 15% discount per concert.

Apart from all the above, there are also stalls to buy instruments inside the RCH and lots of other festival happenings around the city during the duration of the event, all detailed online and in the free programmes available in all the venues. So don’t miss out and join me and over 100,000 friendly other punters at some of the 300 events across 26 stages for Celtic Connections 2018!

For Glasgow sightseeing and foodie tips see my previous festival reviews for Celtic Connections 2016 and Celtic Connections 2017. I will be live tweeting and instagramming during some of the festival, so keep an eye on @lifeisafestival (Twitter) and @lifeisafestivalblog (Instagram) for updates, pictures and videos. Glasgow’s official tourism website is at peoplemakeglasgow.com.

Disclaimer: All pictures in this post were provided by Celtic Connections (Old Fruitmarket picture credit: Louis DeCarlo). Opinions expressed are those of the author. 

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