City of Bridges: 24 Hours in Newcastle

After moving to Glasgow last autumn I had a long list of places to visit in Scotland, but things don’t always turn out the way you think. I have always been fascinated by the history of individual buildings and the people who lived in them. When I was watching the BBC documentary series ‘A House Through Time’ the other day, which portrayed a home in the English city of Newcastle, it seemed like an intriguing place to visit: industrial history, a vibrant cultural scene and many beautiful green spaces, very similar to Glasgow.

NC19 Bridge View.jpg

About a week before the trip I booked a train ticket and found a good hotel deal. I decided to stay one night only and see how much I would manage to discover in 24 hours just by walking a few different neighbourhoods and soaking up the local atmosphere. I made a shortlist of things I absolutely had to see and usually group those by area with spots for lunch or coffee preselected, which gives me a few things to aim for along the route without restricting me too much in terms of spontaneity. It also really helps working out beforehand when certain attractions are closed, so you don’t end up missing out on them. Here are a few of the things I especially enjoyed:

The Lit & Phil

On my travels I often visit beautiful cities and buildings, but not many have the kind of wow factor the Lit & Phil has for me. Fairly unassuming from the outside, you walk up a flight of quite dark stairs until you emerge into the most brilliantly designed (by John Green 1822-25), large yet cosy space every booklover would want to never ever leave again. Give me 180k of books to browse, a cup of coffee and a comfy chair and that’s me sorted. Apart from its undeniable instagram appeal, it was the friendliness and uncomplicated feel of the library that made it even more enjoyable. I was made feel welcome by an enthusiastic volunteer (who worked as a librarian for 40 years) and while it is an independent members library, everyone is encouraged to browse and explore the space. It has always been a place to discuss books, not just for quiet contemplation, so if you want a guaranteed good experience on your visit, even just 10 minutes in here will lift your spirits. The Lit & Phil is a mere 5 minute walk from central station, so no excuse, plus they have lovely souvenirs to take home to those unfortunate ones who missed out on experiencing this amazing library in person.

NC19 Lit & Phil

The Bridge Views

Even if you only have an hour in Newcastle, walk down to any of the bridges and look across the river Tyne and you won’t regret it. The city’s 7 stunningly different bridges spanning the Newcastle Northern side of the river and the Gateshead side on the south are a sight to behold and you’ll never get tired of those fabulous views. In fact, I dare you to walk across any of them and not feel like wanting to take hundreds of pictures from the many possible angles. Once you’ve crisscrossed them to your heart’s content, grab a sandwich, take a seat somewhere by the Quayside and indulge in some people watching. Newcastle is a lively city with a large student population and as I was lucky to have excellent weather during my visit, everyone was out and about enjoying the rays and a relaxed drink by the water. Bliss.

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The Ouseburn Valley

I often find the best places to visit by simply opening Google Maps and zooming in on individual neighbourhoods. When you type in things you enjoy doing or spending time in like (in my case) vegan cafes or charity shops, you often find the best places for a nice walk. I therefore quickly worked out that the Ouseburn Valley (once the cradle of the city’s industrial revolution) east of the city centre would be a fun place to explore and I wasn’t disappointed. After enjoying the views over the city centre from the top floor of the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art I crossed the river and walked east along the water until I got to the Cycle Hub (bicycle repair and great coffee with a view). I then followed a footpath next to the Ouseburn (pronounced ‘use-burn’, a small tributary to the Tyne), which took me past Seven Stories and to Ouseburn City Farm. There is even a horseriding centre just up the road. The Cluny pub right opposite and the Tyne Bar (a bit further south) are both great for live music, so I guess I’ll just have to come back another time. It’s an area that won’t appeal to every first time visitor with its rough charm and mix of old and new, but to me it’s just perfect.

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Green Spaces & Cosy Cafes

City trips don’t need to exclude spending time in nature. On the contrary, many modern cities have a wealth of green spaces, which are well worth enjoying, promoting and saving for future generations. On my second day I walked from the city centre north towards Jesmond, turned right on Osborne Avenue and continued north along the river for a little while, then turned around and walked south on a forest path to Heaton Park, ending up on Heaton Road. I had a chat with dog walkers, European visitors who used to live in the city and locals along the way and one of them recommended The Butterfly Cabinet for brunch. It turned out to be a good tip. After a morning’s brisk walking, I enoyed tucking into a yummy veggie burger and then still had some time left for more sightseeing in the city centre, including the intriguing historic Bessie Surtees House. The day before I found Super Natural Vegan Cafe (see their amazing food below), which I managed to visit twice, as there always needs to be time made for cake.

NC19 Super Natural.jpg

The Sage Gateshead

The large and modern Sage Gateshead music centre and concert hall on the South Side of the Tyne (easily walkable from city centre accommodation) was designed by Norman Foster and opened in 2004. I had been aware of it for a while as they run a fabulous sounding Americana festival ‘Summertyne’ in July (on my list!). So it was very lucky that the one night I happend to be in town an absolutely wonderful special event was taking place. ‘Modern Fairies’ an enchanted mix of folk myths, ancient and modern instruments, storytelling, illustration and film making was simply beautiful and it somehow summed up my whole Newcastle experience for me: it’s a city that manages to marry the old with the new in a vibrant, down to earth way, which is really inspiring. Having scribbled down the dates of lots of upcoming festivals and other cultural events in my notebook, I’m certainly planning to be back fairly soon. I hope the above gives you a few additional reasons to visit this Northern City with its friendly vibe.

NC19 Sage Gateshead.jpg

P.S. If you’re a bunny lover like me or even if you’re not, don’t miss the Vampire Rabbit, you’ll have fun hunting down this bizarre over a century-old gargoyle with a mysterious history in the city centre.

NC19 Vampire Rabbit.jpg

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