Music Makes The World Go Round: Shrewsbury Folk Festival 2015

I love discovering new festivals, the excitement of finding music I’ve never heard before and trying out things I would have otherwise never given a go. But as much as I enjoy variety, I also crave known comforts. Shrewsbury Folk Festival takes place on the August bank holiday weekend every year and for me usually marks the end of a long and fun festival summer. It‘s a time to wind down after a busy couple of months and SFF is the perfect event for it.

It was my fourth time in Shrewsbury this year and the festival never disappoints. Personally, I would have liked to see a few more Americana acts, but hey, it‘s a folk festival after all and one of the best ones around. So all those who are into traditional folk music were spoilt for choice with reliable festival favourites Nancy Kerr, Kate Rusby, The Oyster Band, Steve Knightley and Sharon Shannon as well as many younger but equally popular bands, such as Threepenny Bit, the Young’uns and Lucy Ward.

SFF sunset

There was also a well-received five-hour long peace concert, the annual parade in Shrewsbury town centre with many colourful morris sides entertaining the public, Pandemonium with a huge choice of events for the little ones, and tuneworks music workshops for everyone all weekend long.

The absence of many of the usual „band clash issues“ left me free to really relax into the festival happenings and also led me to some music and experiences I would have probably otherwise missed.

One of my favourite sessions was for instance the songwriting workshop with UK singer/songwriter Jack Harris in the cosy extension of the Berwick Pavillion, which took place once a day from Saturday until Monday. Calling it a songslam was slightly misleading as there was nothing competitive about it at all. Festival attendees took turns presenting their own songs, each followed by the group discussing songwriting techniques and themes (experience of war and family history were popular). It was lovely having the space and time to listen to a lone voice with a guitar in a very supportive environment. No meditation session could have had a more positive and calming effect on us.

Equally mesmerising was a mainstage 2 set by Catrin Finch and Seckou Keita on Monday afternoon. Their way of fusing harp and kora sounds was simply beautiful, two cultures talking to each other through the shared language of music.

Catrin Seckou SFF

I also really enjoyed the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain. Having first seen them at Cambridge Folk Festival this July, I made a note to catch them again and they didn’t disappoint. While the Australian Spooky Men’s Chorale’s humour left me mainly yawning, the subtler sounds and jokes by this fabulous ukes ensemble fitted perfectly into my meditative theme at this year’s festival.

North Carolina based singer/songwriter Jonathan Byrd and the Sentimentals saved the weekend in terms of Americana sounds for me (here is a taste: You Can’t Outrun The Radio) and I heard some rumours there might be more of an Americana focus again next year, fingers crossed.

My favourite festival discovery this year was quite a traditional band though, the young Canadian trio Ten Strings and a Goat Skin from Prince Edward Island who play Acadian, Irish and French tunes as well as their own compositions. Having very much enjoyed their intimate show at Green Note the Monday before, I ended up seeing all three of their Shrewsbury sets. There are many traditional bands around who play fast-paced and fabulous music. What distinguishes the best from the rest, however, is their ability to really connect with an audience. Brothers Rowen on fiddle and Caleb on percussion (incl. bodhran) as well as Jesse on guitar were the surprise hit of this year’s Shrewsbury Folk Festival and by their third set on Sunday night we were all dancing in front of the stage. What fun!

There are many good reasons why Shrewsbury Folk Festival is such a much-loved event. Mine are mostly that the volunteer crew is dedicated and cheerful (so great to see everyone again this year!), the quality of the performers is always reliably high, food and drink choices are varied and plentiful, Shrewsbury town centre with many lovely cafes and (charity) shops is just a stone’s throw away and, best of all, everyone is just getting on with it and having a brilliant time! To put it in a nutshell, the ideal folkie short break, which leaves you invigorated and ready for more of the same the next year and the one after that and so on.

P.S. Nearly forgot #folkiedog! What a pleasure to meet so many folkie dogs again this year, I even recognised a folkie dog family from the equally dog-friendly Maverick festival in Suffolk (note to self: must start #Americanadog next summer…). Here is a little video featuring some of the SFF folkie dogs.

Rimpee folkiedog SFF

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